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Cpl. Jeremy D. Haile, an airframes mechanic with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced), 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, and native of Lancaster, S.C., uses aircraft paint to touch up dozens of screws on an AH-1W Super Cobra aboard USS Bataan March 16, 2009 during the MEU's certification exercise. The CERTEX is the last required training evolution before the MEU deploys this spring.  (Official Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Justin M. Martinez)

Cpl. Jeremy D. Haile, an airframes mechanic with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced), 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, and native of Lancaster, S.C., uses aircraft paint to touch up dozens of screws on an AH-1W Super Cobra aboard USS Bataan March 16, 2009 during the MEU's certification exercise. The CERTEX is the last required training evolution before the MEU deploys this spring. (Official Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Justin M. Martinez) (Photo by Cpl. Justin M. Martinez)

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This photo shows eroded areas of Plumb Beach in Brooklyn after Hurricane Irene hit in 2011. The erosion is threatening the Belt Parkway, which is a critical piece of New York City's infrastructure. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, working in partnership with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and the National Park Service, started sand placement there October 12, 2012, which is the first phase of coastal storm risk reduction work there.

This photo shows eroded areas of Plumb Beach in Brooklyn after Hurricane Irene hit in 2011. The erosion is threatening the Belt Parkway, which is a critical piece of New York City's infrastructure. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, working in partnership with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and the National Park Service, started sand placement there October 12, 2012, which is the first phase of coastal storm risk reduction work there. (Photo by File Photo)

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Army Corps, NYC Parks, National Park Service, beginning coastal storm risk reduction work at Plumb Beach

Posted 10/12/2012

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By Public Affairs


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, working in partnership with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and the National Park Service, will manage the placement of sand along eroded portions of Plumb Beach in Brooklyn starting today as part of the first phase of coastal storm risk reduction work.

Plumb Beach has experienced a great deal of erosion over the years, which could potentially threaten the stability of the Belt Parkway, a critical piece of infrastructure for the region. This project is designed to reduce risk to the Belt Parkway while also replacing valuable beach/dune habitats and improving recreation.

This first phase of the project will involve pumping approximately 127,000 cubic yards of clean sand dredged from Ambrose Channel as part of ongoing efforts to deepen the New York and New Jersey Harbor. When completed, the new beach will be approximately 100 feet wide and 1500 feet long, near the comfort station is currently situated. Temporary geotube groins will be constructed to limit erosion between the sand placement phase and phase 2.

The second phase of the project is scheduled to begin in December and will consist of constructing two permanent stone groins (one at each end of the beach) and an offshore stone breakwater. This phase is intended to greatly reduce the long-term erosion of the sand.

“The Army Corps of Engineers is excited to be able to work with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and the National Park Service to get this important work at Plumb Beach underway," said New York District Commander Col. Paul E. Owen. “This work placing sand and ultimately constructing groins and a breakwater to help prevent loss of that sand will help reduce risks to the Belt Parkway, a critical piece of New York City’s infrastructure, from erosion and weather events for many years to come.”

The approximately $6.5 million project is cost-shared between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, with 65 percent of the funds being federal and the remaining 35 percent coming from the city.

“Parks is pleased to partner with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Park Service to replenish sand and restore the shoreline at Plumb Beach,” said Parks Commissioner Veronica White. “This project will help to both preserve a recreational resource, and protect the Belt Parkway.”

The project includes work on National Park Service land. The Corps and New York City officials worked closely with NPS during the planning of the project and will continue to do so during the sand placement and groin and breakwater construction.

“The National Park Service believes that this project will protect the Belt Parkway while respecting important park natural resources and visitor access to Plumb Beach” said Linda Canzanelli, Superintendent of Gateway National Recreation Area.

The first phase is slated to be completed in November. The second phase is slated to begin in December and be completed in spring 2013.

 

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