US Army Corps of Engineers
New York District

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Army Corps completes construction of the Long Beach Coastal Storm Risk Reduction Project

Published April 24, 2019
Updated: April 23, 2019
Historic Storm Damage in Long Beach, NY

Historic Storm Damage in Long Beach, NY

Historic Storm Damage in Long Beach, NY

Long Beach, N.Y., Nov. 8, 2012 -- Aerial views of Hurricane Sandy damage to homes on Long Beach, New York. Following the hurricane, a nor'easter struck the area causing more power outages and additional flooding. FEMA is working with state and local officials to assist residents who were affected by Hurricane Sandy. Andrea Booher/FEMA Photo by Andrea Booher - Nov 07, 2012 - Location: Long Beach, NY.

Long Beach, NY

Heavy machinery works to set up pipes for sand pumping at Long Beach, NY.

Long Beach, NY

Heavy machinery works to set up pipes for sand pumping at Long Beach, NY

Long Beach, NY

Heavy machinery works to set up pipes for sand pumping at Long Beach, NY

All coastal storm risk management features of this Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Project are complete and in place prior to the upcoming June 1st, 2019 hurricane season. Dune crossover and planting work continues into Fall 2019.  

NEW YORK – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, announced the completion of construction on the Long Beach Coastal Storm Risk Reduction Project. The $130 million project was performed in two phases over a three year period that included construction of 4 new groins and the rehabilitation of 18 existing groins, installing 284,000 tons of rock. The Corps also used 3.2 million cubic yards of sand to widen the beach and reinforce sand dunes, which play a crucial role in flood risk reduction. As part of this project, the Corps was able to expand the beach approximately 150 feet from Long Beach to Point Lookout. Completion of this project means storm risk reduction measures are now complete in advance of the upcoming Hurricane Season, which begins on June 1, 2019.

“This is a great day for the citizens of Long Beach, Lido Beach and Point Lookout, and represents the culmination of hard work and sacrifice over multiple years,” said New York District Commander Col. Thomas D. Asbery. “The residents of this community are now safer from the impacts of violent storms and coastal flooding. We would like to thank our partners at the local, state, and federal levels, who worked with us to ensure this important work was completed.”

"Countless homeowners and businesses in Long Beach, Lido Beach and Point Lookout were hammered by Superstorm Sandy and required a massive federal investment to both recover and to rebuild the island's defenses against the next storms," said U.S. Senator Charles Schumer. "That's why I fought so hard to deliver billions in federal investments, including this Long Beach Coastal Storm Risk Reduction Project. The $130 million project includes construction of four new groins, fixing up 18 existing groins, installing 284,000 tons of rock, and placing 3.2 million cubic yards of sand to widen the beach and build up sand dunes. I am proud we worked so hard to deliver these vital resources to make our communities and infrastructure more resilient, greener and stronger with no cost to the local taxpayer."

"I'm thankful to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for completing this project to help protect the communities of Long Beach, Lido Beach, and Point Lookout as we approach this year's hurricane season," said U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. "With the threat of stronger storms hitting our coastlines, it is vital that we complete the projects that reinforce Long Island's existing infrastructure, and continue to be proactive on building up our shoreline's storm resiliency. These are important life-saving measures and I will always fight to make sure that our communities have the resources they need to be protected against the next major storm."

"The completion of dredging and beach-fill operations on Long Beach marks a major milestone for our community," said U.S. Representative Kathleen Rice. "Rebuilding our shoreline and mitigating beach erosion has always been a critical part of the Sandy recovery process. These projects have made our beaches stronger and more resilient than ever before and will ensure that the Long Beach community is better prepared to withstand future storms. I would also like to thank the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for their incredible work and continued partnership.”

"Protecting coastal communities from the risks of flooding and erosion is a responsibility the state takes seriously, and I am pleased to work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and our local partners to help address these risks at Long Beach," said Basil Seggos, commissioner, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).  "The Long Beach coastal project is one of several state-federal efforts underway to safeguard communities along New York's Atlantic coast."   

As the designated non-federal sponsor for this project, DEC has worked on a daily basis with its local sponsors, Nassau County, the town of Hempstead, city of Long Beach, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to ensure this project meets the intent of the design to protect both properties and the citizens of these areas. DEC reviewed all of the engineering plans and specifications, worked with USACE to address engineering concerns, conducted environmental assessments, and established binding conditions to limit impacts to birds, including the plovers and benthic habitat (off shore sand "borrow" areas). DEC also undertook efforts to reduce the project's temporary impacts on the local economy, help maintain beach access and quality of life during construction, and facilitated logistics and project staging with the city of Long Beach.

“The County has been a partner and local sponsor on this vital project from its inception and I am proud to see years of diligent, collaborative work on the local, state, and federal levels come to fruition,” said Nassau County Executive Laura Curran.  “Reinforcing and rebuilding our shorelines helps protect our residents against major storms and is crucial to preserving our County’s cherished beachfronts, vibrant ecosystems, communities, infrastructure and parks.  As part of this project, the County’s Nickerson Beach Park in Lido Beach saw replenishment and building of dunes and four new pedestrian crossovers to allow for access to the waterfront – previously destroyed by Superstorm Sandy.  I want to thank the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for their partnership and work to safeguard our County’s coast.”

“Completing this important project just-in-time, before the start of Hurricane Season, is a huge relief for thousands of homeowners in the Town of Hempstead, many of whom were completely flooded by Superstorm Sandy,” said Hempstead Town Supervisor Laura Gillen. “By rebuilding stronger, smarter, safer and hardening our vulnerable beachfronts and shorelines, our coastal residents can sleep a little bit easier at night. I would like to thank Senator Schumer and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for their outstanding work and commitment to our beachfront communities.” 

"The completion of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beach renourishment signifies a monumental milestone in the City's history," said Long Beach City Council President Anthony Eramo. "For the first time ever, we have an engineered beach, designed to withstand future storms. I am proud of signing on to the agreement that authorized this project several years ago and voting to enable the Army Corps to work around-the-clock to expedite its completion. It is truly rewarding to see our long-term planning come to fruition. On behalf of the City, I would like to sincerely thank Senator Schumer for ensuring that this essential project would be fully federally funded with no additional cost to local taxpayers."

The project area is located on the south shore of Long Island — consisting of approximately 9 miles of oceanfront from Jones Inlet to East Rockaway Inlet. The area is subject to direct wave attack and flooding during major storms and hurricanes, causing damage to structures located along the barrier island. A historical low height and narrow width of the beach front has increased the potential for storm damage.  Damaging storms have occurred in 1938, 1950, 1953, 1960, 1962, 1984, 1991, 1992 and 2012.  In October 2012, Super Storm Sandy was credited with over $250 million dollars in damages. The project was 100% federally funded under Public Law 113-2.

The project was executed using two contracts. Contract 1 consisted of the complete construction of 4 new groins and 18 groin rehabilitations throughout Long Beach and Point Lookout, NY. A stone seawall was also constructed at Point Lookout.

Contract 2 consisted of the placement of 3.2 million cubic yards of sand for the beach and dunes. Vehicle and pedestrian dune cross-overs along with dune plantings and sand fencing were also installed throughout the project area.

The Corps will continue to perform dune crossover and planting work on this project, which is expected to be completed by Fall 2019.


Contact
Michael Embrich
917-790-8007
cenan-pa@usace.army.mil

Release no. 19-005