US Army Corps of Engineers
New York District

Westhampton Beach Interim Project

This project provides interim protection to the Westhampton Beach area west of Groin 15 and affected mainland communities north of Moriches Bay. The project provides for a protective beach berm and dune, tapering of existing groins 14 and 15, and construction of an intermediate groin (14a).

The project also includes periodic nourishment as necessary to ensure the integrity of the project design, for up to 30 years (through 2027). Beach fill also includes placement within the existing groin field to fill the groin compartments and encourage sand transport to areas west of groin 15.

Initial construction was completed in December 1997 at an approximate cost of $20 million. The project has performed better than anticipated in terms of cost, project performance and beneficial environmental impacts. The first renourishment was completed in February 2001 ($5 million); the second in December 2004 ($4.5 million); and a portion of the third renourishment was completed in February 2009 ($9.5 million).

In response to Sandy damages in 2012, the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (P.L. 113-2), funded construction for restoration of this project to its original design template at 100 percent federal expense. This construction contract was completed October 2015. 

The project’s fourth renourishment contract was awarded September 30, 2019 to Weeks Marine, Inc., for $22.3 million. The contractor is scheduled to start construction on 25 November 2019 depending on weather conditions. An estimated contract quantity is 1.2 million cubic yards of sand, based on a survey performed in February 2019. Required coastal and environmental monitoring efforts continue every year within the Westhampton project area. 





Contact: Rifat Salim, Project Manager
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Programs & Project Mgmt. Division
26 Federal Plaza
New York, NY 10278
Tel. 917-790-8215
Salim.rifat@usace.army.mil

 

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